March 2008 Archives

08.3.25 Two clocks 129x133 017a.jpg U.K. clocks go forward on Sunday morning, 30 March '08, and the lighter evenings which British Summer Time brings will cheer up almost everyone. But there would also be many other anticipated benefits, from road safety to energy conservation and healthier lifestyles, were we to keep 'Daylight Saving' all year. A Downing Street petition has now been set up to urge a continuous BST trial period of three years, with research to establish the extent of these benefits.

'Daylight Saving' is an issue which won't go away. And now there's a Petition to the Prime Minister, asking him to not to let that precious extra hour of afternoon light go away in the Winter either.

Downing Street petition
The Downing Street petition aims to 'make better use of the limited daylight we receive'. It reads as follows:

We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to consider a change to the current system of British Summer Time / Greenwich Mean Time (BST/GMT). This could consist of a trial period (similar to that adopted 1968 to 1971) and could take the form of a move to year round BST, or a 1 hour shift to GMT+1/GMT+2. Research shows that such a move could reduce carbon dioxide emissions, reduce road deaths, facilitate business with Europe, potentially boost tourism, increase outdoor activity, promote healthier lifestyles and enhance the well being of UK citizens.

You can read more detail of the Petition, and / or sign it, here.

BST Facebook group
There is also a Facebook group, set up like the Downing Street petition by Dave Alexander, which seeks to 'raise support of and debate the possibilities and benefits regarding changes / trials of different time zone options for Britain.....This could reduce carbon dioxide emissions, reduce road deaths, facilitate business with Europe, potentially boost tourism, increase outdoor activity, promote healthier lifestyles and enhance the well being of UK citizens.'

An enduring idea
This is by no means a new proposal, as we have already established very firmly on this website, but the need to get some action becomes greater with each year. If further debate is needed, the BST: British Summer Time & 'Daylight Saving' section of this weblog remains a forum where everyone from the South coast to scattered Scottish isles is welcome to share their ideas.

Discussion is however no substitute for evidence-based action. Health, energy sustainability and accident prevention are too important to ignore.


This article was also published as a New Start external blog.

Read more: BST: British Summer Time & 'Daylight Saving' (The Clocks Go Back & Forward)

08.3.22 Sefton Park Easter Bunny hats! 262x92  051.JPG Sefton Park is the venue for a very organised fitness training programme. The wearers of these cheery Easter bonnets are amongst those for whom even the Bank Holiday weekend offers no let up on the exercise regime.

08.3.22 Sefton Park Easter keep-fit enthusiasts 491x456 051a.jpg

See more photographs at Camera & Calendar,
and read more about Sefton Park.

Merseyside County Council (logo) shield Incredibly, it was twenty two years ago that the Conservative government closed down the Metropolitan County Councils , thereby ensuring control from the national centre of power. The impact on local decision-making was huge, as was the effort subsequently required to rebuild the regional administrative decision-making process.

The Metropolitan County Councils, like the Greater London Council and the Inner London Educational Authority, were powerful bodies representing local and regional interests, and were seen as irritants on the national body politic. So Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher decided they 'had to go'.

But as Dr Richard Beeching also demonstrated, when years earlier he closed many local and regional railway lines, it takes little time to destroy something which holds together the physical or political regional infrastructure - and an enormous amount of money and effort to reinstate it.


Merseyside County Council closure reception invitation 20th March 1986 'For workers in the Merseyside arts community'

This is the invitation I received to the Merseyside County Council closure reception for 'Workers in the Merseyside Arts Community', on 20 March 1986, at Metropolitan House, Old Hall Street, Liverpool. The evening was hosted by Cllr Keva Coombes, a local lawyer and Leader of the Merseyside County Council.

See more photographs at Locations & Events and read more about Regions, Sub-Regions & City Regions.

08.3.16a Cross arms 115x96 001aa.jpgSenior women leaders are often criticised for being less confident than the men, and for feeling unable to delegate. Is this any wonder, when those very men don't play fair? It's time for sexist attitudes in the corridors of power to be challenged head-on - which is exactly what Margot Wallström, Chair of the Council of Women World Leaders Ministerial Initiative, has just been doing.


The truth is, men choose men. It is as simple as that – not a question of lack of ambition, of interest or of aptitude from women.

So, in her article A thick layer of men, says Margot Wallström, Chair of the Council of Women World Leaders Ministerial Initiative, a network of current and former women presidents, prime ministers and ministers aiming 'to promote good governance and enhance democracy globally by increasing the number, effectiveness, and visibility of women who lead at the highest levels in their countries'.

Chaps' clubs
Well, I of course agree. There has to be some explanation of the neglect of women's (much-needed) talents, and the most obvious is that they're not part of the Gang. Until 90 years ago, women in the UK weren't even permitted to vote, let alone to be members of the UK's ultimate chaps' club, Parliament, where many of the really big decisions are made.

We all know that the dynamic of debate and decision-making changes as the gender ratio also changes, both for men and for women.

And of course some men are always fairminded and exemplary in their professional conduct and beliefs; but sadly not as yet in sufficient numbers to secure the fundamental changes essential for genuine gender (or other) equality.

Determined rather than confident?
Maybe this explains claims at the moment that there may now be more women taking leadership roles, but these women are 'less confident' than their male peers, and feel more obliged to 'check the detail' and don't like to delegate.

You can only let the detail go, and feel confident, if you know that what you ask to be done, is indeed being done.

The next step towards gender equality can only be taken by the male half of the workforce. When men (and some other women) are as amenable to women as to men issuing the orders, leaders who happen to be female will feel confident that they don't need to check up on everything.

Challenge the sexism, not the upshot
Until that's fully grasped - and until ungendered collaboration and compliance in the workplace becomes a required part of professional behaviour for everyone - criticism of women's leadership styles is, quite simply, unfair and out of order.

All power, I say, to Margot Wallström's elbow, as she puts the ball back firmly in the chaps' court.

Alexander Holladay

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Alexander Holladay Alexander Holladay is a cellist and a member of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, which he joined in 2007 aged 25.
A graduate of Cambridge University and the Royal Academy of Music, he is also professor of 'cello at the University of Liverpool.
Alex is a regular performer with Ensemble Liverpool and Elegant Music and has throughout his studies and career been an enthusiast for the chamber music repertoire, especially that for piano trio.

Alexander Holladay lives in Liverpool, where he is a member of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. He holds an MA in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University, having also been for five years a member of the National Youth Orchestra. In 2005 Alex graduated from the Royal Academy of Music, London, where he studied with Colin Carr and Philip Sheppard.

Whilst at the Academy he received the prestigious DipRAM and various prizes, including the Thomas Fitton Prize for Strings, for best post-graduate final recital.

Alex then continued performing as a concert soloist and throughout the country with the Lawson Piano Trio. He has been invited to play with numerous professional orchestras, including the Philharmonia Orchestra, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Philharmonic and the Northern Ballet orchestra.

Various tours have taken Alex to Germany, Hungary, the United States of America, South Africa and New Zealand.

Contact emails: Alexander Holladay; Ensemble Liverpool; Elegant Music.

Read more about Ensemble Liverpool and Elegant Music.

www.ensembleliverpool.co.uk
www.elegantmusic.co.uk

Hope Street Suitcases 214x113 The Hope Street 'Suitcases', installed by John King in 1998, are at the junction with Mount Street, by LIPA (the old 'Liverpool Institute') and Liverpool School of Art, opposite Blackburne House Centre for Women. The labelled suitcases 'belong' to many of Hope Street Quarter's most illustrious names and organisations.

Hope Street Suitcases, Liverpool: 'A Case History by John King'

This installation, entitled 'A Case History', was created by John King, and first on view in 1998. It is in the heart of Liverpool's Hope Street Quarter, an area with a wonderful cultural offer and many attractive restaurants and bars.

Its positioning was altered in 2006 in the course of the upgrade of Hope Street's public realm, when the area was levelled and seating and a tree were added. The view down Mount Street to the River Mersey is stunning.

There is a noticeboard (pictured in part below) alongside this public art installation with a numbered diagram which gives information about who or where the some of the suitcases and packages 'belong'. Those cases with 'owners' are demarked by labels which are explained on the noticeboard. Some further details and links follow:

Hope Street Suitcases (numbered)

1. Arthur Askey (1900-1982) comedian, who attended the Liverpool Institute for Boys.

2. Henry Booth (1788-1869) was a corn merchant and railway pioneer; he was born in Rodney Street and founded the Liverpool to Manchester Railway, opened in 1830 as the first railway line intended for passengers.

3. Josephine Butler (1828-1906), feminist pioneer in social welfare and the abolition of slavery.

4. Robert Cain (1826-1907), brewer, who built the Philharmonic Public House on Hope Street.

5. Anne Clough (women's rights champion, 1820-1892) and her brother Arthur Clough (poet, 1819-1861), who lived in Rodney Street.

6. Charles Dickens (1812-1870) the author, who lectured and gave readings in the Liverpool Institute.

7. Dr William Henry Duncan (1805-1863) Liverpool's first Medical Officer of Health, who was largely responsible for the 1845 Sanitary Act, and lived in Rodney Street.

8. Alan Durband (1927-1993), who taught English at the Liverpool Institute and was a founding mover for Hope Street's Liverpool Everyman Theatre.

9. Hahnemann Hospital*, an 1886 Queen Anne Revival building, and also the first Homeopathic Hospital in Britain, sited in Hope Street.

10. Kwok Fong, born in Canton in 1882 and a member of Liverpool's Chinese community, helped Chinese and Asian crews sailing from Liverpool.

11. E. Chambre Hardman (1898-1988), photographer, whose house and studio at 59 Rodney Street is now in the care of the National Trust.

12. George Harrison (1943-2001), musician and a member of The Beatles, who attended The Liverpool Institute.

13. June Henfrey (d.1992), the Liverpool University lecturer in Ethnic Studies in the Department of Sociology who came from Barbados and helped to establish Blackburne House Centre for Women.

14. Sir Robert Jones (1855-1933), introducer, with his friend Thurston Holland, of the medical X-ray at the Royal Southern Hospital and the Liverpool Radium Institute (now Josephine Butler House*) which in 1882 moved to 1 Myrtle Street, by the Hope Street junction.

15. John Lennon (1940-1980), musician and member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool School of Art*.

16. The Liverpool Institue for Performing Art (LIPA), which opened in 1995/6 with strong support from Sir Paul McCartney, of which Mark Featherstone-Witty was (and is) Founding Principal.

17. The Liverpool Poets: Adrian Henri (1932-2000), who was a founding supporter and Patron of CAMPAM and HOPES: The Hope Street Association and who lived in Mount Street, Roger McGough (b.1937), and Brian Patten (b.1946)

18. R.J. Lloyd, linguist who attended Liverpool Institute and promoted Esperanto.

19. James Martineau (1802-1900), theologian who lived in Mount Street.

20. Sir Paul McCartney (b.1942), musician and member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool Insitute and was co-founder of and still contributes substantially to the development of LIPA.

21. Brendan McDermott, who was a painter and print-maker and taught at the Liverpool School of Art.

22. Dr Malcolm Sargent (1895-1967), Principal Conductor of the (later, Royal) Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra between 1942 and 1963.

23. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1880-1960), the architect who designed Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral.

24. (Lady) Margaret Simey (1906-2004), social and poltical activist who supported the founding of Blackburne House Centre for Women and for many years lived almost next door, in Blackburne Terrace.

25. Stuart Sutcliffe (1940-1962), musician and early member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool School of Art.

26. Reverend HH Symonds (1885-1958), Headmaster of Liverpool Institute and countryside enthusiast who in 1934 founded the Friends of the Lake District.

27. Sam Walsh (1934-1989), Irish-born artist who taught at Liverpool School of Art.


See also
Hope Steet Quarter and the Suitcases
Liverpool's Two Cathedrals and
Camera & Calendar.

[* Please note that some of these buildings are to be - or when you read this may have already been - demolished or redeveloped for new use.]

Many of the people and places above are, as their weblinks reveal, inter-woven in fascinating ways. Liverpool's Hope Street area was self-evidently a knowledge quarter long before the term was coined.

Do you know more about any of these people and institutions and their history? Can you tell us more about how the 'Suitcases' were commissioned or installed? Or are there others also whom ideally you'd like to see celebrated via A Case History?

If so, please do share your information, recollections and ideas below. Thank you!

Global warming graffiti Cropper Street Liverpool 08.3 282x122 113c.jpg It was quite a surprise to see the global warming slogans which appeared from nowhere in Liverpool city centre - especially given the name of the street itself! Someone's been doing their homework on the stats; and the figures are truly scary...

Global warming graffiti Liverpool 08.3 500x370 113b.jpg

Liverpool car pollution graffiti 500x148 08.3 114a.jpg

See more photographs at Camera & Calendar