Recently in Hope Street Quarter Category

Josephine Butler House Liverpool, ruined Josephine Butler House in Liverpool's Hope Street Quarter is named for the famous social reformer, and the site of the first UK Radium Institute. Latterly an elegant adjunct to Myrtle Street's The Symphony apartments, it sits opposite the Philharmonic Hall. But the intended ambiance has been ruined by a dismal failure and omission on the part of Liverpool City Council, who have permitted Josephine Butler House to be grimly defaced with little prospect of anything better, or even just intact, taking its place.

Liverpool & Merseyside, The Future Of Liverpool and Regeneration.

The Symphony, previously part of the City of Liverpool College of Further Education portfolio (and before that, the Liverpool Eye, Ear & Throat Infirmary), is a newly restored apartment block immediately opposite Liverpool's Philharmonic Hall. It is elegantly refurbished by Downing Developments and adds an attractive dimension to city centre living in Liverpool's historic Hope Street Quarter.

View of The Symphony from Liverpool Philharmonic Hall,  Myrtle Street Liverpool

But just a year ago this weekend (i.e. in the first few days of March 2008) residents of those apartments saw tarpaulin raised around their neighbouring building, the historic Josephine Butler House, home to the UK's first Radium Institute (which is celebrated in the Liverpool 'Suitcases' Hope Street / Mount Street sculptures) and named after the social pioneer whom Millicent Fawcett described as “the most distinguished woman of the Nineteenth Century".

Josephine Butler (1828 -1906) was an extraordinarily accomplished British social reformer, who had a major role in improving conditions for women in education and public health. She moved to Liverpool in 1866, when her husband, the academic George Butler, became headmaster of Liverpool College. Much of her work derived its inspiration from the death of their young daughter, and she has a national library, a collection at Liverpool University, an educational institution and a charitable trust named for her. Her life and work is also celebrated locally in the Suitcases ('A Case Study') public art installation a block up the road on the Hope Street / Mount Street junction in Liverpool.

Josephine Butler House with tarpaulin

So what followed after the Josephine Butler House was swathed in tarpaulin was almost beyond belief - with just days to go before a formal enquiry, Maghull Developments, who had recently acquired Josephine Butler House in partnership with the previous owners, Liverpool John Moores University, took hammers to its entire street-facing facade.

Josephine Butler House, Liverpool , Myrtle Street facing facade ruined

Josephine Butler House, Liverpool, Hope Street facing wall ruined

The Liverpool Daily Post reported Maghull Developments in March 2008 as saying, nonetheless, that the work under wraps on the frontage was “specialist restoration work to the stone facade” - a claim which is difficult to reconcile with the still intact stonework of the Stowell Street side of the building, unblemished to this day:

Josephine Butler House Liverpool, Stowell Street side wall, intact

But if the City Council had amended their omission, as many times requested, to include this corner of Hope Street in the Conservation Area, they could have protected the entire historic location at a stroke.

The plans for the Josephine Butler House site had been in considerable contention even before these extraordinary events. There were public meetings and demands that proposals be returned to the drawing board because they were adjudged inappropriate for Hope Street Quarter - Liverpool's cultural quarter, the home of the city's two cathedrals, its two largest universities, its internationally recognised orchestra and several theatres, and a critically important gateway into the city centre.

Josephine Butler House, Liverpool, ruined ; next door to The Symphony

A comment, at the time of the 'specialist restoration', from Liverpool City Council's elected environment portfolio holder, says it all:

Why would they restore the stone facade when they are planning to knock the building down? Don’t treat us like we are dim.
The building is an intrinsic part of what makes Hope Street so special, but there’s very little the council can do short of me sleeping under the scaffolding.

So much for the 'legacy' of Liverpool's status as 2008 European Capital of Culture.

What worries some of us is not even just that the Josephine Butler scaffolding has now long disappeared and the damage surely done.

It's that, in brutal fact, the prospect of any action on the Josephine Butler site - beyond perhaps demolition to become a car park? - looks itself from where we sit to be exceedingly dim; and that the whole City Council seems still to be asleep on the job.

Josephine Butler House Car Park Liverpool (corner of Hope Street & Myrtle Street)

Josephine Butler House, Liverpool defaced


[PS This sad saga was taken up by Ed Vulliamy in The Observer of 20 March 2009, in an article entitled How dare they do this to my Liverpool.. There is also a prolonged debate about Josephine Butler House on the website SkyscraperCity.

An updated version of this article (here) was published on the Liverpool Confidential website, on 22 April 2009.]

See more photographs of Liverpool & Merseyside and read more about The Future Of Liverpool and Regeneration.

Liverpool Tunnel airvent outlet & Liverbirds There can be few issues, at the local level, more pressing than what's to happen to one's city. As Liverpool's European Capital of Culture Year ends, perhaps the new LinkedIn Group on 'The Future of Liverpool' will help to sharpen our ideas.

The Future Of Liverpool

For Liverpool, 2008 has been a year of enormous change, as buildings have come down and gone up, roads have disappeared and re-emerged, and of course the European Capital of Culture has taken, massively, the centre stage.

But now the emphasis must move from these transitions to our longer-term future; new critiques and ideas will emerge and point us in as yet unrevealed directions. And everyone who can will need to be involved; not just those who sit in committee rooms.

To help the debate along a new LinkedIn Group open to all has been formed. To join, simply go to LinkedIn and then search Groups for 'The Future of Liverpool'. Your contributions will be very welcome.


Read more articles about The Future Of Liverpool and see photographs of Liverpool & Merseyside.

HOTFOOT 2005 Tayo Aluko (baritone soloist) wears his T-shirt Every year from 1996 HOPES has produced a limited edition T-shirt for everyone involved to wear for the Hope Street Festival; and only in that first year was there no special performance at the Philharmonic Hall. So 1997 marked the first of the subsequently annual HOPES HOTFOOT concerts which celebrate the exciting and diverse communities in Liverpool's Hope Street Quarter. That's a lot of people - orchestra musicians, singers, helpers and supporters - and, as we see below, a lot of editions of the T-shirts...

1977 Original Hope Street Festival T-shirt logo 1996 Hope Street Festival T-shirt logo 1997 Hope Street Festival & HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 'Hotfoot on Hope Street'


1998 Hope Street Midsummer Festival & HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 1999 HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 2000 Hope Street Midsummer Millennium Festival & HOTFOOT T-shirt logo

2001 Hope Street Midsummer Festival & HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 2002 HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 'KOOL STREET' 2003 HOTFOOT T-shirt logo


2004 HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 2005 HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 'Tradewinds' 2006 'Hotfoot on Hope Street 1997-2006' HOTFOOT T-shirt logo


2007 'Celebrating 30 Years of the Midsummer Festival ' & HOTFOOT T-shirt logo 'Liverpool First & Last' 2008 HOTFOOT 08 T-shirt 'Cafe Europe'



And 2009? Who is to say?...


HOTFOOT 2007 T-shirts & helpers
HOTFOOT 2007 T-shirts modelled enthusiastically!


HOTFOOT 2006 T-shirts & helpers


HOTFOOT T-shirts 2005 Choir 'Trade Winds'


The original 1996 Hope Street Festival HOPES T-shirt modelled by Martin Anthony (Tony) Burrage, who commissioned the original T-shirts and is Leader / Director of the HOPES Festival Orchestra
Martin Anthony (Tony) Burrage


See also:
HOTFOOT on Hope Street (The Concert)

Hope Street Festival, 1997 -

HOPES: The Hope Street Association

and more photographs in Camera & Calendar

08.05.29 Hope Street Liverpool Orrery Suitcases 147x98  001a.jpg The Liverpool Orrery came to Hope Street last week, to the Suitcases plateau; and with it came lots of happy and excited children, eager to see the universe from the Unity Theatre's special SplatterFest! perspective. Using the public realm like this shows more clearly than any words how creativity can engage our communities and our imaginations.

08.05.29 Hope Street  Liverpool Orrery  Suitcases 500x449   003a.jpg

08.05.29  The Liverpool Orrery & Suitcases Hope Street  Splatterfest 500x380 007a.jpg

Read more about the Hope Street Quarter and the 'Suitcases' (A Case Study).

See more photographs: Camera & Calendar.


What is an Orrery? Find out here; and read about Unity Theatre and SplatterFest!.

Hope Street Suitcases 214x113 The Hope Street 'Suitcases', installed by John King in 1998, are at the junction with Mount Street, by LIPA (the old 'Liverpool Institute') and Liverpool School of Art, opposite Blackburne House Centre for Women. The labelled suitcases 'belong' to many of Hope Street Quarter's most illustrious names and organisations.

Hope Street Suitcases, Liverpool: 'A Case History by John King'

This installation, entitled 'A Case History', was created by John King, and first on view in 1998. It is in the heart of Liverpool's Hope Street Quarter, an area with a wonderful cultural offer and many attractive restaurants and bars.

Its positioning was altered in 2006 in the course of the upgrade of Hope Street's public realm, when the area was levelled and seating and a tree were added. The view down Mount Street to the River Mersey is stunning.

There is a noticeboard (pictured in part below) alongside this public art installation with a numbered diagram which gives information about who or where the some of the suitcases and packages 'belong'. Those cases with 'owners' are demarked by labels which are explained on the noticeboard. Some further details and links follow:

Hope Street Suitcases (numbered)

1. Arthur Askey (1900-1982) comedian, who attended the Liverpool Institute for Boys.

2. Henry Booth (1788-1869) was a corn merchant and railway pioneer; he was born in Rodney Street and founded the Liverpool to Manchester Railway, opened in 1830 as the first railway line intended for passengers.

3. Josephine Butler (1828-1906), feminist pioneer in social welfare and the abolition of slavery.

4. Robert Cain (1826-1907), brewer, who built the Philharmonic Public House on Hope Street.

5. Anne Clough (women's rights champion, 1820-1892) and her brother Arthur Clough (poet, 1819-1861), who lived in Rodney Street.

6. Charles Dickens (1812-1870) the author, who lectured and gave readings in the Liverpool Institute.

7. Dr William Henry Duncan (1805-1863) Liverpool's first Medical Officer of Health, who was largely responsible for the 1845 Sanitary Act, and lived in Rodney Street.

8. Alan Durband (1927-1993), who taught English at the Liverpool Institute and was a founding mover for Hope Street's Liverpool Everyman Theatre.

9. Hahnemann Hospital*, an 1886 Queen Anne Revival building, and also the first Homeopathic Hospital in Britain, sited in Hope Street.

10. Kwok Fong, born in Canton in 1882 and a member of Liverpool's Chinese community, helped Chinese and Asian crews sailing from Liverpool.

11. E. Chambre Hardman (1898-1988), photographer, whose house and studio at 59 Rodney Street is now in the care of the National Trust.

12. George Harrison (1943-2001), musician and a member of The Beatles, who attended The Liverpool Institute.

13. June Henfrey (d.1992), the Liverpool University lecturer in Ethnic Studies in the Department of Sociology who came from Barbados and helped to establish Blackburne House Centre for Women.

14. Sir Robert Jones (1855-1933), introducer, with his friend Thurston Holland, of the medical X-ray at the Royal Southern Hospital and the Liverpool Radium Institute (now Josephine Butler House*) which in 1882 moved to 1 Myrtle Street, by the Hope Street junction.

15. John Lennon (1940-1980), musician and member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool School of Art*.

16. The Liverpool Institue for Performing Art (LIPA), which opened in 1995/6 with strong support from Sir Paul McCartney, of which Mark Featherstone-Witty was (and is) Founding Principal.

17. The Liverpool Poets: Adrian Henri (1932-2000), who was a founding supporter and Patron of CAMPAM and HOPES: The Hope Street Association and who lived in Mount Street, Roger McGough (b.1937), and Brian Patten (b.1946)

18. R.J. Lloyd, linguist who attended Liverpool Institute and promoted Esperanto.

19. James Martineau (1802-1900), theologian who lived in Mount Street.

20. Sir Paul McCartney (b.1942), musician and member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool Insitute and was co-founder of and still contributes substantially to the development of LIPA.

21. Brendan McDermott, who was a painter and print-maker and taught at the Liverpool School of Art.

22. Dr Malcolm Sargent (1895-1967), Principal Conductor of the (later, Royal) Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra between 1942 and 1963.

23. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (1880-1960), the architect who designed Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral.

24. (Lady) Margaret Simey (1906-2004), social and poltical activist who supported the founding of Blackburne House Centre for Women and for many years lived almost next door, in Blackburne Terrace.

25. Stuart Sutcliffe (1940-1962), musician and early member of The Beatles, who attended Liverpool School of Art.

26. Reverend HH Symonds (1885-1958), Headmaster of Liverpool Institute and countryside enthusiast who in 1934 founded the Friends of the Lake District.

27. Sam Walsh (1934-1989), Irish-born artist who taught at Liverpool School of Art.


See also
Hope Steet Quarter and the Suitcases
Liverpool's Two Cathedrals and
Camera & Calendar.

[* Please note that some of these buildings are to be - or when you read this may have already been - demolished or redeveloped for new use.]

Many of the people and places above are, as their weblinks reveal, inter-woven in fascinating ways. Liverpool's Hope Street area was self-evidently a knowledge quarter long before the term was coined.

Do you know more about any of these people and institutions and their history? Can you tell us more about how the 'Suitcases' were commissioned or installed? Or are there others also whom ideally you'd like to see celebrated via A Case History?

If so, please do share your information, recollections and ideas below. Thank you!

Jim Gill  2007  Liverpool  Vision 115x114.jpg The public realm refurbishment of Hope Street, the thoroughfare which defines Liverpool’s cultural quarter, was finally completed in May 2007. This has offered an opportunity to reflect on, and learn some lessons from, the decade of activity culminating in Hope Street’s new look. Jim Gill, Chief Executive of Liverpool Vision, agreed to share his perceptions of that decade and what it has achieved for Hope Street and the City of Liverpool.

What follows is a summary of a conversation between Jim Gill, Chief Executive of Liverpool Vision, and Hilary Burrage, Hon. Chair of HOPES: The Hope Street Association, the body which since the early 1990s has consistently lobbied for the recognition and refurbishment of Liverpool’s Hope Street. In this discussion Hilary posed questions to which Jim responded.


Hope Street’s value to Liverpool and beyond
Hilary: Jim, thank you for agreeing to discuss Hope Street with me, as the street’s refurbishment is finally completed and the last few public seating areas are installed and lit. You’ve been involved in this process almost from the beginning, initially through English Partnerships, and then as Chief Executive of Liverpool Vision, the UK’s first Urban Regeneration Company. How would you describe the value of Hope Street, as a core part of Liverpool’s city centre?

Jim: Hope Street has huge intrinsic value. The problem is recognising it and exploiting it in an appropriate way; and in that we still have a way to go. But there’s no doubt that the perceived value of the street has increased significantly, both because of the public realm refurbishment and as a result of the individual development schemes, for instance by both Cathedrals, the Hope Street Hotel, the restaurant scene and of course the refurbishment of the Philharmonic Hall.


Securing the refurbishment of Hope Street
Hilary: Can you tell me what finally clinched the decision to refurbish Hope Street?

Jim: Essentially, it was HOPES pestering us, your solid determination to see something happen. Initially the refurbishment of Hope Street was just a long-term ‘red zone’ aim for Liverpool Vision; but we converted that to an immediate action ‘green zone’ because of your persistence.

It was the meeting which you (Hilary) and Adrian (Adrian Simmons, HOPES’ Hon. Secretary) had with myself (Jim) which clinched it. You told me how dis-spirited you were about lack of progress, and I agreed that we would develop proposals with you. And of course HOPES had also secured the full support of Steve Broomhead, Chief Executive of the North West Development Agency, so at that point things started to move.


A different way forward
Hilary: Was it a different way to do things?

Jim: Yes, it was a very different way! There have been two or three tranches of significant public realm works in Liverpool, such as Williamson Square and East Moorfields. Those projects involved ‘set piece’ consultation with the public through exhibitions. But the Hope Street process involved real community engagement from the beginning.

Engagement is always more difficult to achieve in an area with many individual, non-collective voices, but HOPES constituted a ready-made ‘panel’ which enabled deeper involvement of local stakeholders as well as the normal consultation.


The knowledge economy
Hilary: How significant is the knowledge economy (scientific, academic and cultural) around Hope Street Quarter? Has the refurbishment of the street had an impact on this economy?

Jim: We haven’t yet properly grasped how (if) we can capture all the benefits of the area. Clearly there is a link between the fortunes of Hope Street Quarter and the wider area which includes the Universities and much else; but this is not yet consolidated.

In fact, Liverpool Vision is currently engaged with both the University of Liverpool and Liverpool John Moores University in producing a prospectus / audit of the local knowledge economy and the contribution which it makes to the City and the Regional economy. The figures are very impressive. We believe that the quality of the Hope Street area has major role to play in supporting the growth of the Knowledge Quarter, and vice versa.

But we don’t yet fully comprehend the value of the knowledge economy. Knowledge can and will drive the City economy towards self-sustainability. Our ‘Transitional’ Programme for the City Centre suggests a refocusing of activity ‘up the hill’ to Hope Street, embracing the crescent of opportunity surrounding the city centre, linking the waterfront, Hope Street and the Knowledge Quarter, extending as far as LJMU’s Byrom Street Campus.

We all need to understand the potential of these links better. This perspective underlines our shifting focus ‘up the hill’; the quality of space around Hope Street can indirectly benefit the knowledge economy, including Hope Street’s high artistic skills. Hope Street, as you have said many times, is a sort-of South Bank and needs to be valued as such.


Lessons learned
Hilary: What lessons can we learn from the ‘story of Hope Street’? What helped or hindered the process and what of the future?

Jim: The first lesson is to understand what can be achieved by working in a real partnership where local stakeholders are fully engaged, as they were in this case through the mechanism of HOPES.

Second, for the future, recognition of the importance of the Knowledge Economy – and consequent actions - will be critical. As I have already mentioned, Liverpool Vision has recognised the importance of the wider Hope Street-Knowledge Quarter area and as we merge into the proposed new economic regeneration vehicle for the City we want to make sure the priority is taken forward, so that the potential of the wider ‘University Edge’ is maximised. This is a key strategic priority at Regional, not just City level.

Third, my mantra is, ‘Don’t kid yourself the job’s done.’ There has been massive change in the City Centre and the pace of change continues at a high level. But much more needs to be done to secure the long term economic health of the City and lasting opportunity for the people of Liverpool. We have to ensure the opportunity that is Hope Street isn’t lost. The wider Hope Street area will be a major contributor to the economic health of the City and the provision of additional jobs.

The associated challenge is to ensure that people needing the jobs here can get to them, and to spread the opportunities around. That, I’d suggest, is what real regeneration is about.

And lastly, I’d say the biggest challenge for HOPES is that you need somehow to keep and widen your circle of friends; not easy when you’re an unsupported voluntary body, but it’s necessary. HOPES has a central role in moving things along, but it will need to be flexible in how it does things and how it relates to developments.


The professional perspective
Hilary: Thank you. As you know, most of HOPES’ members are professional people in their own right, who have given their time and skills ‘for free’ to bring about the changes now seen in Hope Street. This has produced an interesting dynamic, perhaps because regeneration professionals on the ‘official’ side more often work with community groups with fewer professional qualifications than themselves. My other question here is therefore what ‘lessons’ can be learned from this unusual situation about how to get the best from such a dynamic. Are there particular issues for instance in respect of ownership of the ideas and developments?

Jim: Working with the HOPES members on the public realm project was occasionally challenging, probably because the level of engagement was close and because each of the stakeholders had clear views as to what would or wouldn’t ‘work', and because they were able to argue their corner very strongly. We had a shared goal which, I think, was achieved.

I think the wider lessons for all stakeholders is to learn how to work with other groups, for example, non-professional stakeholders, and to recognise that everyone's goals and aspirations have validity. Ultimately more will be achieved if the Hope Street area speaks with a single voice which embraces all interests.


Worst and best so far
Hilary: What have we done worst and best, so far?

Jim: The worst is probably the time it has taken, or is taking, to secure a full recognition across the range of ‘public' organisations - including the City Council - of the importance of the area for the future economic health of the City.

The best is that you mustn’t underestimate what HOPES has achieved as, a voice for the area and in delivering activity. As I said, it was the discussion I had with you and Adrian which effectively clinched the resources to deliver the public realm project. You have secured formal recognition of the area; and the stakeholder group which we’ve developed from your original group of activists has worked quite well. We’ve come a long way.

Read also: The Hope Street Festivals (1996 - 2006)
Liverpool's Hope Street Festivals & Quarter (1977 - 1995)

HOPES Festival logo (small) 110x116.jpg HOPES: The Hope Street Association marks the thirtieth anniversary of the inaugural Hope Street Festival with a HOTFOOT 2007 concert offering many elements of previous such events. Tayo Aluko, Tony Burrage, Richard Gordon-Smith, Sarah Helsby-Hughes, Hughie Jones, Roger Phillips and Surinder Sandhu join children from Merseyside schools and the stalwart HOPES Festival Orchestra and Choir for an event not be missed.



HOTFOOT 2007! A Street of Hope for 30 Years

Celebrating 30 years of the Hope Street Festival


Buy your tickets here.


The first Hope Street Festival took place in 1977, when Her Majesty the Queen visited Liverpool as part of her Silver Jubilee tour. There was another Festival in 1980 and then no more until HOPES: The Hope Street Association was able to resurrect the event in 1996. HOPES, with support from the Liverpool Culture Company and the Community Foundation for Merseyside, has chosen to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the inaugural Hope Street Festival with a HOTFOOT 2007 concert which incorporates many of the elements of previous such events.

Sunday 22 July 2007 @ 7 pm (please note time),
Liverpool Philharmonic Hall, Hope Street, L1 9BP

with

* Roger Phillips (Presenter)

* Richard Gordon-Smith (Conductor)

* The HOPES Festival Orchestra and Choir

(Leader / Director: Martin Anthony (Tony) Burrage)

and guests

CONCERT PROGRAMME:

Surinder Sandhu and the Saurang soloists
returning to HOPES to perform music by Surinder Sandhu (orchestrated by Richard Gordon-Smith) with the HOPES Festival Orchestra

Songs of the Sea with Hughie Jones' Jack Coutts, Kevin Bargen & Friends, featuring some of the performers who made the Mersey Shanty Festival an international success, singing shanties and sea songs from the days of the great sailing ships - the other music that Liverpool gave to the world a century before the Mersey Sound !

HOPES Festival Orchestra
performs Samuel Coleridge-Taylor Petite Suite de Concert

Sarah Helsby-Hughes (soprano) & Tayo Aluko (baritone) join the HOPES Festival Orchestra
for Gershwin’s ‘Summertime’ and other songs from Porgy & Bess

Children from Merseyside schools, with the HOPES Orchestra, perform
Liverpool First and Last
which they have themselves devised for HOPES with Richard Gordon-Smith & Tony Burrage, now arranged, orchestrated and conducted by Richard Gordon-Smith

Grand finale
where the entire company performs
HOPES’ Song for Liverpool, ‘Light Up The City' (from Cool Street) by Richard Gordon-Smith.


Exhibition
* We are delighted that the National Trust / Chambre Hardman have also agreed to put on an exhibition in the foyer of the Phil Hall on the day. (HOPES was a major advocate of 'saving' the Chambre Hardman House, at 59 Rodnet Street, Liverpool.)

Tickets for the show
(Sun 22 July, 7 pm [please note start time]
are now available from the Phil Box office: 0151-709 3789
or via the Liverpool Philharmonic website
at £7, £9 & £11 (£5 children).

And, finally……If you would like to be involved in this concert, as a performer, singer or sponsor / raffle donor please contact us a.s.a.p. on hope.street@btconnect.com. Thank you!

HOPES is grateful to The Liverpool Culture Company and The Community Foundation for Merseyside, both of which generously provided grant-aid for this concert.

HOTFOOT 06.9.16 Richard Gordon-Smith, Tony Burrage & HOPES Festival Orchestra (small) 90x115.jpg The annual 'HOTFOOT' Concert in Liverpool's Philharmonic Hall - set this year for 7 p.m. on Sunday 22 July - has been a Midsummer favourite for over a decade now. HOPES: The Hope Street Association, the charity which promotes and produces the concert, is delighted that the 2007 concert will receive support of £5,000 from the Liverpool Culture Company.
Our theme this year is HOTFOOT 1977 - 2007 A Street of Hope for 30 Years. We would be thrilled if you too would be involved, support us and attend.

The annual HOTFOOT on Hope Street concert, put on by HOPES: The Hope Street Association, is always an exciting and incredibly positive event, but it does offer its own challenges. One of these is how are we, the Trustees of the sponsoring charity, HOPES, going to pay for it?

The idea of a concert led by fully professional musicians, but at which amateur and student performers are welcome regardless of age or background, is great. How many other opportunities are there in a year for people to sing and play on the stage of the world-famous Philharmonic Hall with musicians from the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra? But the logistics and costs of this enterprise are not issues easily resolved.

Good news
So today's news for HOPES from the Liverpool Culture Company is fabulous. We are to receive from them the full £5,000 which we requested towards our budget.

This is really welcome not only because it reduces the worries about money (though there's still a substantial way to go) but because, we like to think, it is a recognition of the work we in HOPES have done over the years to enhance and promote the Hope Street Quarter and the communities which have a stakehold in that area of Liverpool.

The tasks ahead
But this is only a beginning. Writing a successful bid is one thing; delivering the project well is another altogether. The tasks ahead [**] which now confront us include:

* obtaining substantial further sponsorship to meet our costs;
* finalising details of the concert programme, to fit the agreed theme of HOTFOOT 1977 - 2007 A Street of Hope for 30 Years - we are planning another amazing world premiere by HOPES' Composer in Association, Richard Gordon-Smith;
* putting out the invitations to all who may be interested to join us as performers;
* arranging all the back-stage bureaucratic things which must be in place before any public performance;
* devising and delivering an effective marketing and promotions strategy;
* booking the best professional musicians to coach the non-professional performers and to take 'anchor player' roles in the concert;
* settling, and confirming with all performers, dates and venues for rehearsals and the like;
* designing and ordering the T-shirts (mementos which all performers get to keep, and so different every year);
* writing and publishing the fliers, poster and programmes (sponsors most welcome!); and
* ensuring the tickets sell well in advance, and on the day.

[** which I once listed poetically (!) in a light-hearted / light-headed post-performance moment]

Volunteers at work
Some of the professional musicians' time (quite rightly) apart, all these tasks are done by volunteers. But co-ordinating volunteers, even very willing and able ones, is not the easiest way to get anything done, and it all still takes a great deal of everyone's energy and time.

But at least we are now properly at the starting line; and as ever we are confident that the concert will be all we could wish for, a great evening out for performers and audience alike.

How you can help and get involved
So, if you'd like to help (thank you for asking), there are a number of ways you are most welcome to do this:

* You can be sure to buy tickets (from the Phil Hall box office, on 0151-709 3789, or via their website).
* If you sing, or can play an orchestral instrument at roughly Grade V or above, you would be most welcome to join us in the HOPES Festival Choir or Orchestra - just email us with your details and we will be in touch.
* You can ensure your colleagues, friends and neighbours all know about the concert, and how to get tickets and / or become involved in the performance.
* You could join HOPES and perhaps become part of the HOTFOOT organising or support team.
* You or your company would be welcomed with open arms if you would like to become a (profiled) sponsor of this event, which is fully supported by the Liverpool Culture Company; again, please just email us and we will get back to you.

Be there on Sunday 22 July at 7 p.m.!
If you're planning to be in Liverpool on 22 July there will only be one place to be - the Philharmonic Hall on Hope Street. More details will follow shortly, but do be sure to put HOPES' annual concert in your diary right now.

We look forward very much to seeing you at 7 p.m. on 22 July at HOTFOOT on Hope Street 2007, as part of Liverpool's 800th Anniversary ('Birthday') celebrations.

06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral & St James' Gardens The Cathedral Church of Christ, Liverpool, designed by the then-22-year-old (later Sir ) Giles Gilbert Scott’s, is built on St. James’ Mount at the southerly end of Hope Street Quarter. Bishop Francis James Chavasse, second Bishop of Liverpool, decided to build it in 1901 and King Edward VII laid the Foundation Stone on 19 July 1904. The Cathedral was consecrated twenty years to the day later, but not until October 1978 did Queen Elizabeth II attend a service to mark completion of the largest of our Cathedrals in Britain. And now the civic value of St James' Cemetery and Gardens is also recognised.



07.01.04 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral silhouette at dusk from Everyman Theatre & RC Cathedral on Hope Street






















See more photos of Liverpool's Cathedrals and celebrating communities on Hope Street here [Liverpool's Two Cathedrals] and below....



06.03.04 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral St James Gardens frost , view from lower Hope Street / Gambier Terrace

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06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral & St James Gardens




















06.11.19  Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral Huskisson Memorial St James' Gardens & Gambier Terrace (lower Hope Street) 06.11.19  Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral St James' Cemetery freshwater spring below Gambier Terrace


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06.11.19  Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral St James' Cemetery tombstones (1645)






















06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral from St James' Gardens & Cemetery






















Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral & Oratory  Tracey Emin  'bird on a stick' 'Roman Standard' sculpture 06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican) Cathedral Oratory Tracey Emin's 'bird on a stick' 'Roman Standard' sculpture




























06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican, St James') Cathedral from Toxteth






















06.11.19 Liverpool (Anglican, St James') Cathedral front lit up, with Elisabeth Frink's 'Risen Christ' sculpture over great door






















Read more about:

Hope Street Quarter
Liverpool Cathedral
St. James' Cemetery And Gardens
The Friends of St James'
Liverpool's Two Cathedrals
Dame Elisabeth Frink
(1930-1993; Risen Christ was installed was installed one week before Frink's death)
Tracey Emin (b.1963; Emin's Cathedral work, Roman Standard - or 'bird on a stick' - was her first public art installation; she intends to do another one for the cathedral in 2008)

See also photgraphs at
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King and
Calendar & Camera
.

Hope Street Farmers' Market 06.11.19 (small).jpgThe regular calendar of Farmers' Markets in Hope Street has at last begun. From now on the third Sunday every month is scheduled as Market Day for Hope Street Quarter. Farmers' Markets are something different to look forward to: a great day out for adults and children alike, with fun opportunities to learn where our food comes from and who grows it.

H.St. Farmers Market 2.jpgAfter a false start in October, yesterday was the long-awaited commencement of the regular calendar [see schedule at the end of this article] of Hope Street Farmers' Markets. At last, with luck, we have lift-off, and not a moment too soon.

And we were incredibly lucky with the weather, brilliant sunshine for the duration, not even really cold. The atmosphere of the event was cheerful and relaxed, just the right ambiance for a happy family Sunday outing - though I have to say I was surprised just how few children were actually around....

It's really good to see the grown-ups enjoying themselves in such a time-honoured and positive way, but are we missing a bit of a trick here if we don't bring the kids? Perhaps someone will begin now to think how this could be an occasion for them as well. It's not often the opportunity arises naturally in the city centre for youngsters to meet people who have themselves grown the food and prepared the produce displayed before us.

Varied and fresh
H.St.Farmers Market 7 (veg).jpgH.St.Farmers Market 8 (cheese).jpgH.St.Farmers Market 10 (romanesca cauliflower).jpgHaving said that, here was produce for everyone. Vegetable and fruit - including a variety of cauliflower (romanesca, a brassica with stunning tiny, spiral green florets) that I'd never seen before - plus cheeses, food of all sorts to eat right now, and much else, including candles and preserves for the coming festive season. Judging from the public response, everyone loves this sort of browsing and shopping.

One of the many attractions of farmers' markets is that much of this produce had been grown or made by the actual people who were selling it - not a connection which is often so direct these days, when much of what we buy comes shrink-wrapped and complete with a fair number of attached food miles.

H.St.Farmers Market 4 (.Xmas).jpgH.St.Farmers Market 5 (preserves).jpgThis was an opportunity for locally-based people to purvey their wares; hand-made goods and food which may well still have been in the field a few hours before.

Trading busily
H.St.Farmers Market 6 (Farmers).jpgThe people running the stalls were pleased to be there, trade was brisk. I suspect that over time the current size of the market will grow considerably, if the regulations allow - already it stretches all the way along the Hope Street wall of Blackburne House.

We know of course that, locals though some of the growers and sellers may be, Geraud Markets, the organisation behind the venture, is big business; but someone has to organise all the detailed arrangements which these events entail. It seems Geraud now have a contract with Liverpool Council to do just that on several sites around the city.

Knowing more and feeling good
That however is only part of the story. This is the sort of enjoyable meeting-friends event that offers, especially, young people in the city a chance to see that fruit and vegetables don't of necessity arrive covered in plastic.H.St. Farmers Market 14 (Minako).jpg

It gives us a feel, too, for seasonal food. It reminds us, walking out in the open air as we make our purchases, that there is a cycle to things; we can eat for a whole year without bringing produce from across the world, should we decide to do avoid doing so. We can be 'eco-', and enjoy, at the same time.

The market reminds us about nutritional quality - seeing produce presented so directly perhaps also helps us to think more carefully about what we are actually eating. Of course, food sold in supermarkets can also be fresh and nutritious - canned can be as good as 'fresh' - but the connection with its production is less overt.

Encouraging a healthy life-style
H.St. Farmers Market 15 (children).jpgBy a strange co-incidence, just today there have been articles in the local Daily Post about vegetables and health -the local Primary Care Trust has a Taste for Health campaign -and The Guardian, which offers thoughts by Zoe Williams on 'Vegetables and how to survive them').

Liverpool people have the worst health in England and we owe it to our children to make sure their diet is as good as it can possibly be, encouraging them to understand the connection between what they eat and where it comes from. How better could we do it than by bringing them to a farmers' market where they can see for themselves what it's all about?

Liverpool City Council have contracted with Geraud to provide farmers' markets. Perhaps they can now follow the example of the authorities in continental Europe (where Geraud began) such as Valencia and Aix-en-Provence, where, as I have seen for myself, the local markets make children really welcome?

It would do us all good, in every sense of the word.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Calendar of Geraud Farmers' Markets in Liverpool [subject to change, please contact to check as below]:
Monument Place Farmers' Market (Lord Street) ~ Every 1st & 3rd Saturday of the month
Lark Lane Farmers' Market ~ Every 4th Saturday of the month
Hope Street Farmers' Market (Blackburne House end) ~ Every 3rd Sunday of the month

Other Geraud Markets in Liverpool
:
Broadway (Indoor) Monday ~ Saturday
Garston ~ Friday
Great Homer Street ~ Saturday
Monument Place ~ Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Speke ~ Thursday
St Johns' (Indoor) Monday ~ Saturday
Tuebrook ~ Thursday & Saturday
Toxteth ~ Tuesday
For more information contact: 0151 233 2165 / info@geraudmarkets.co.uk

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